All posts filed under: Active Health

Red blood cells

Quick Question – What are oxygen sats?

We seem to have developed a range of new vocabulary since the onset of the Covid-19 global pandemic. Suddenly words such as self-isolate, health modelling and social distancing have become the norm. Some of the medical terminology that’s now filling our social media feeds can be unknown and confusing. A question I’ve seen a few times is, ‘What are oxygen sats?’ so I thought I’d answer it in my #quickquestion series. Red blood cells carry oxygen around our body. They pick up oxygen molecules when they travel through the lungs and then transport it around the body attached to haemoglobin, which is a protein in the red cell. Our body’s organs and tissues need a steady supply of oxygen for them to function. Oxygen sats is the short form of oxygen saturation and is a measure of how close blood is to being completely saturated with oxygen. Sats are measured in per cent and the goal is 100 per cent. You might also see oxygen abbreviated to its chemical symbol O2. Healthy people will have …

Active Health Podcast – Swimming after Childbirth

So when can you go swimming after you’ve given birth? Not something you ever think to ask until you’re in the position when you want to go and suddenly wonder if you should! This podcast gives advice and tips about returning to swimming and exercise in general. Listen in to Episode 4 of Active Health right here, on WiSP Sports or on your favourite podcast app.

Active Health Podcast- Hay fever

I began a new adventure this year with a podcast series for WiSP Sports, a wonderful platform which shares the stories of women in sport, celebrates achievements and provides knowledge and information. They currently have 14 hosts and a global audience of more than 3.2 million! I’ll be sharing the complete Active Health podcast series over the coming weeks. Kicking off with Episode 1 – Hayfever. Just click play to listen in.

www.drjulietmcgrattan.com

What's it like to have a mammogram?

I was quite surprised when an invitation to attend breast screening arrived on my door step. I wasn’t expecting one until I was fifty and that’s three years away. Anyway, it turns out that I was being asked to be part of a trial, to see if lowering the age for screening was a worthwhile thing to do and whether the benefits outweighed the risks.